Temple Tour in Indonesia

 Temple Tour



Temple tourism in several regions in Java is very potential. Moreover, in Java there are hundreds of large and small temples dating from the 5th to 15th centuries AD. A small number of temples are found in Bali, Sumatra and Kalimantan.



Temple conservation, which means maintenance and restoration, is currently being promoted. The purpose of conservation is so that the temple can be enjoyed by the wider community. Unfortunately, the temple as a cultural center has received less attention from various circles. Ironically, the government then turned it into an economic center, namely for tourism.

Read Also : Conservation-Based Tourism

Since the 1980s when the tourism sector became more promising, the government has tried to attract dollars from the pockets of tourists. In the name of foreign exchange and development, many facilities are made and offered for the enjoyment of tourists. Settlements near Borobudur Temple, for example, were evicted for the construction of the Borobudur Temple Tourism Park.



History shows that the management of tourism activities through the commercialization of temples has never benefited archaeologists. The cost of archaeological research, including the restoration of the temple, is too large. Not to mention the cost of maintaining the temple. Expenditures will never be proportional to the income from fees and other tourism profit effects.



Just an illustration, now Borobudur Temple has become a government money-producing machine. Many experts consider the cultural and sacred values ​​of Borobudur to have sunk. The splendor of this world heritage is tarnished by hawkers, street vendors, and other tourism facilities.



Actually, the archaeologist R. Soekmono (late) once disagreed with being called a tourist park. He is more inclined to the term ancient garden. However, it seems that the economic factor is considered more important, even though building the nation's culture is far more important.

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